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Publications Tagged: saddam

Kuwaiti National Security and the U.S.-Kuwaiti Str... Cover Image
Added September 14, 2007
Kuwaiti National Security and the U.S.-Kuwaiti Strategic Relationship after Saddam. Authored by Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
The author examines the national security concerns that Kuwait must address in the turbulent post-Saddam era. Challenges involving Iraq, Iran, and terrorism are severe and will require both Kuwaitis and Americans to rethink and revise previous security approaches to meet important shared goals.
Revisions in Need of Revising: What Went Wrong in ... Cover Image
Added December 01, 2005
Revisions in Need of Revising: What Went Wrong in the Iraq War. Authored by Dr. David C Hendrickson, Dr. Robert W Tucker.
The authors examine the contentious debate over the Iraq war and occupation, focusing on the critique that the Bush administration squandered an historic opportunity to reconstruct the Iraqi state. They argue that the most serious problems facing Iraq and its American occupiers—criminal anarchy and lawlessness, a raging insurgency and a society divided into rival and antagonistic groups—were virtually inevitable consequences that flowed from the act of war itself.
Iraq and Vietnam: Differences, Similarities, and I... Cover Image
Added May 01, 2004
Iraq and Vietnam: Differences, Similarities, and Insights. Authored by Dr. Jeffrey Record, Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
The authors conclude that the two conflicts bear little comparison. They also conclude, however, that failed U.S. state-building in Vietnam and the impact of declining domestic political support for U.S. war aims in Vietnam are issues pertinent to current U.S. policy in Iraq.
Nationalism, Sectarianism, and the Future of the U... Cover Image
Added July 01, 2003
Nationalism, Sectarianism, and the Future of the U.S. Presence in Post-Saddam Iraq. Authored by Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
The author addresses the critical questions involved in understanding the background of Iraqi national identity and the ways in which it may evolve in the future to either the favor or detriment of the United States. He pays particular attention to the issue of Iraqi sectarianism and the emerging role of the Shi'ite Muslims, noting the power of an emerging but fractionalized clergy.
Defeating Saddam Hussein's Strategy... Cover Image
Added January 01, 2003
Defeating Saddam Hussein's Strategy. Authored by LTC Raymond A. Millen.
Should war break out between Iraq and the United States, Saddam Hussein will likely adopt a strategy designed to undermine the prestige of the United States and turn the Arab World against the West.
Land Power and Dual Containment: Rethinking Americ... Cover Image
Added November 01, 1999
Land Power and Dual Containment: Rethinking America's Policy in the Gulf. Authored by Dr. Stephen C. Pelletiere.
In an attempt to regain some control of the strategic commodity, Washington developed special relationships with the two foremost oil procedures, Iran (under the Shah) and Saudi Arabia. Dual Containment, promulgated in 1993, was supposed to constrain the two most powerful area states, Iran and Iraq, by imposing harsh economic sanctions on them. But, the author contends, the policy has only antagonized America's allies.
Managing Strains in the Coalition: What to Do Abou... Cover Image
Added November 01, 1996
Managing Strains in the Coalition: What to Do About Saddam? Authored by Dr. Stephen C. Pelletiere.
Iraq's September 1996 actions in the Kurdish north found such a seam in coalition objectives, or, to return to the original metaphor, shook one anchor of the U.S. policy tightrope. Dr. Stephen Pelletiere examines how the Kurdish crisis developed, why--most disturbingly--the key coalition members divided in response to U.S. actions, and what factors might guide future U.S. policy. He concludes that U.S. policy needs reanchoring if we are to achieve our paramount interests in this vital region.