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Publications Tagged: acquisition

Contractors on Deployed Military Operations: Unite... Cover Image
Added September 01, 2005
Contractors on Deployed Military Operations: United Kingdom Policy and Doctrine. Authored by Professor Matthew Uttley.
The author examines the controversies surrounding deployed contractor support, the ways that the United Kingdom Ministry of Defence (MoD) has harnessed private sector capacity, and the lessons this provides for U.S. policymakers and military planners. He suggests the need for ongoing policy and doctrine refinement by defence officials as well as greater independent scrutiny of developments, not least because the use of contractors on deployed operations has an important impact on government expenditure choices, public accountability, the efficiency and effectiveness of the military establishment, and the conduct and outcome of armed conflict.
The New Craft of Intelligence: Achieving Asymmetri... Cover Image
Added February 01, 2002
The New Craft of Intelligence: Achieving Asymmetric Advantage in the Face of Nontraditional Threats. Authored by Mr. Robert D. Steele.
This monograph is the third in the Strategic Studies Institute's "Studies in Asymmetry" Series. In it, the author examines two paradigm shifts--one in relation to the threat and a second in relation to intelligence methods-- while offering a new model for threat analysis and a new model for intelligence operations in support to policy, acquisition, and command engaged in nontraditional asymmetric
Whither the RMA: Two Perspectives on Tomorrow's Ar... Cover Image
Added June 01, 1994
Whither the RMA: Two Perspectives on Tomorrow's Army. Authored by COL Raoul Henri Alcala, Dr. Paul Bracken.
While economic power has increased in importance in international relations, military power as traditionally conceived remains a dominant factor in determining the status of nations. He argues that doctrines will provide the basis for force structure, training, and weapons acquisition.