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Publications Tagged: Iraq War

The Iraq War: Learning from the Past, Adapting to ... Cover Image
Added February 23, 2007
The Iraq War: Learning from the Past, Adapting to the Present, and Planning for the Future. Authored by Dr. Thomas R. Mockaitis.
The Iraq War has been the subject of heated political debate and intense academic scrutiny. Much argument has focused on the decision to invade and the size of the force tasked with the campaign.
Revisions in Need of Revising: What Went Wrong in ... Cover Image
Added December 01, 2005
Revisions in Need of Revising: What Went Wrong in the Iraq War. Authored by Dr. David C Hendrickson, Dr. Robert W Tucker.
The authors examine the contentious debate over the Iraq war and occupation, focusing on the critique that the Bush administration squandered an historic opportunity to reconstruct the Iraqi state. They argue that the most serious problems facing Iraq and its American occupiers—criminal anarchy and lawlessness, a raging insurgency and a society divided into rival and antagonistic groups—were virtually inevitable consequences that flowed from the act of war itself.
Strategic Effects of Conflict with Iraq: The Middl... Cover Image
Added March 01, 2003
Strategic Effects of Conflict with Iraq: The Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey. Authored by Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
War with Iraq signals the beginning of a new era in American national security policy and alters strategic balances and relationships around the world. The specific effects of the war, though, will vary from region to region. A U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq will place popular pressure on a number of moderate Arab states to reduce high profile military cooperation with the United States. Following a war, Saudi Arabia will probably seek to reduce substantially or eliminate the U.S. military presence in the kingdom due to a more limited regional threat and the domestic difficulties with a U.S. presence.