U.S. Army War College >> Strategic Studies Institute >> Items Tagged Hizballah

Subscribe using RSS RSS | Cart: 0 items  |   Login to "My SSI"   |   Contact Us

Strategic Studies Institute
United States Army War College

The Source for National Security
                      Research and Analysis

Publications Tagged: Hizballah

The United States and Iraq's Shi'ite Clergy: Partn... Cover Image
Added February 01, 2004
The United States and Iraq's Shi'ite Clergy: Partners or Adversaries? Authored by Dr. W. Andrew Terrill.
The author addressed the critical need to gain the cooperation or at least the passive tolerance of the Shi'ite clerics and community. Such an effort could become more challenging as time goes on, and one of the recurring themes of this monograph is the declining patience of the Shi'ite clergy with the U.S. presence. Some key Shi'ite clerics are deeply suspicious of the United States, exemplified by conspiracy theories.
Hizballah: Terrorism, National Liberation, or Mena... Cover Image
Added August 01, 2002
Hizballah: Terrorism, National Liberation, or Menace? Authored by Dr. Sami G. Hajjar.
The author reviews the history of Hizballah since its inception in 1982, and examines its role in the recent political turmoil of Lebanon and the region. Not only is Hizballah's role central in the dispute over the Sheb'a Farms enclave between Lebanon and Israel, it is part of an entangled set of linkages involving Syria, Iran, the United States, the European Union, and the Palestinians.
Terrorism: National Security Policy and the Home F... Cover Image
Added May 01, 1995
Terrorism: National Security Policy and the Home Front. Authored by Dr. Stephen C. Pelletiere.
The recent bombing of the Federal Building in Oklahoma has highlighted the complexity of the phenomenon of political extremism. Until this occurred, inside the United States foreign terrorists were the focus of attention, particularly the so-called Islamic fundamentalists. Undue emphasis on the "foreign connection" can make it appear that only Middle Eastern terror is of consequence. The Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) has long resisted this approach.