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Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso

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Lieutenant Colonel (Ret.) Michael J. Colarusso is a senior research analyst in the Army’s Office of Economic and Manpower Analysis at the United States Military Academy, West Point. He co-authored the six-monograph “Officer Talent Management Series” published by the Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College. His primary areas of research are organizational design, generational dynamics, human capital and talent management. Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Colarusso holds a B.A. in history from Saint John’s University and an M.A. in history from the Pennsylvania State University.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso

  • Senior Officer Talent Management: Fostering Institutional Adaptability

    February 14, 2014

    Authored by Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle.
    View the Executive Summary

    Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates characterized the "greatest challenges facing the Army" as the "institutional and bureaucratic constipation" of its officer management systems. In this book, Mike Colarusso and Dave Lyle examine the Army's industrial-era personnel practices and prescribe a senior officer talent management approach that they believe is better suited to the demands of tomorrow.

  • Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Employing Talent

    May 05, 2010

    Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
    Historically, the U.S. Army has employed its officers to good effect, but is there need for improvement? Does its current assignments paradigm lead to optimal career satisfaction and productivity? Does it allow officers to develop the depth and breadth of talent the Army needs? Perhaps most importantly, does the Army really know enough about the officer talent it possesses, as well as the requirements for that talent?

  • Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Developing Talent

    March 29, 2010

    Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
    The U.S. Army is almost universally acknowledged as an organization that powerfully develops talent in areas such as leadership, teamwork behavior, work ethics, adaptability, fitness, and many others. Employers know that the Army invests substantially in its people, and that this investment translates directly into enhanced productivity. Despite this well-earned reputation, however, are the Army’s current officer development programs equal to tomorrow’s challenges? Does it suffer from a growing imbalance in talent supply versus demand? Perhaps most importantly, is there an effective relationship between its developmental and employment strategies?

  • Accessing Talent: The Foundation of a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy

    February 19, 2010

    Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
    Organizations often focus their recruiting efforts on high-payoff markets--how does the Army identify the right market in which to focus its officer accessions efforts? What role does education play in officer accessions? How does the Army identify and go about meeting its officer diversity requirements? Why is establishing the proper ratio between commissioning sources so important?

  • Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Retaining Talent

    January 15, 2010

    Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
    Why have Army junior officer retention rates plummeted since 1983? Are the root causes truly understood? What are the long term consequences of failing to retain talented young officers? What steps has the Army taken to meet this challenge, and how effective have they been? What must the Army do to restore junior officer retention rates to previously healthy levels?

  • Talent: Implications for a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy

    October 28, 2009

    Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
    What is the difference between competent and talented? What is talent, and which people have it? What talents should the United States Army seek in its officers? Most importantly, what are the consequences of failing to create an officer talent management system?

  • Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: A Proposed Human Capital Model Focused upon Talent

    March 31, 2009

    Authored by Colonel Casey Wardynski, Lieutenant Colonel David S. Lyle, Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Michael J. Colarusso.
    The authors consider America’s continuing commitment to an all-volunteer military, its global engagement in an era of persistent conflict, and evolving changes in its domestic labor market.