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Strategic Studies Institute

United States Army War College

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Dr. Mary Grizzard

External Researcher

MARY F. GRIZZARD is currently in the Army G-3 division at the Pentagon and is an action officer on Latin American issues. Her previous assignments include instructor in the Department of Humanities at the University of Florida, Professor in the Latin American Institute (LAI) at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, as well as a Visiting Professor at the Universidad Nacional Autómoma de México in Mexico City. In 1990, she was elected to the office of president of the Latin American Concilium (the faculty body of the LAI) and headed the Partners of the Americas (New Mexico Chapter). In 1993, Dr. Grizzard was awarded the highly competitive Foster Fellowship in the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and worked closely on multilateral arms control issues at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva, and the First Committee of the UN General Assembly. Upon completion of the fellowship, she was named Principal Investigator on the Department of Justice study, examining the effects of the 1995 immigration law changes on those individuals applying for political asylum. Dr. Grizzard received her B.A. degree from Rice University and her Ph.D. at the University of Michigan.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by Dr. Mary Grizzard

  • Building Regional Security Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere: Issues and Recommendations

    October 01, 2003

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring, COL Wendy Fontela, Dr. Mary Grizzard, Mr. Dennis M. Rempe.
    Dr. Max Manwaring and his team of conference rapporteurs have generated a substantive set of issues and recommendations. They have provided a viable means by which to begin the implementation of serious hemispheric security cooperation. This report comes at a critical juncture, a time of promise for greater economic integration between the United States and Latin America.