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Strategic Studies Institute

United States Army War College

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Dr. James J. Wirtz

External Researcher

JAMES J. WIRTZ is Associate Professor of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey CA. He earned his degrees in Political Science from Columbia University and the University of Delaware. He was a John M. Olin Fellow at the Center for International Affairs, Harvard University, and he joined the Naval Postgraduate School in 1990 after teaching at Franklin & Marshall College. He is the author of the Tet Offensive: Intelligence Failure in War (Cornell University Press, 1991, pbk 1994). His work has been published in Defense Analysis, Intelligence and National Security, International Journal of Intelligence and National Security, International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence, International Security, Orbis, Political Science Quarterly, Security Studies, Strategic Review, Studies in Intelligence and The Journal of Strategic Studies. He teaches courses on military innovation and joint warfare, international relations theory and intelligence.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by Dr. James J. Wirtz

  • Counterforce and Theater Missile Defense: Can the Army Use an ASW Approach to the SCUD Hunt?

    March 01, 1995

    Authored by Dr. James J. Wirtz.
    The Gulf War demonstrated that theater missile defense (TMD) will be an important mission for the U.S. Army and its Patriot defense system in the years ahead. The author suggests that Army planners should view TMD not just as a simple tactical problem, but as an exercise that has important political and strategic ramifications that cut to the core of U.S. efforts to create and maintain international coalitions.