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Strategic Studies Institute

United States Army War College

The Source for National Security

Research & Analysis

Dr. Max G. Manwaring

Research Professor of Military Strategy
Area(s) of Expertise: Theory of grand strategy; U.S. national security policy and strategy; military strategy; military and nonmilitary operations other than war; political-military affairs; and Latin America.

Phone: (717) 245-4076
Email Dr. Max G. Manwaring

Photo Dr. Max G. Manwaring is a Professor of Military Strategy in the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) of the U.S. Army War College (USAWC), has held the General Douglas MacArthur Chair of Research at the USAWC, and is a retired U.S. Army colonel. He has served in various civilian and military positions, including the U.S. Southern Command, the Defense Intelligence Agency, Dickinson College, and Memphis University. Dr. Manwaring is the author and co-author of several articles, chapters, and books dealing with Latin American security affairs, political-military affairs, and insurgency and counterinsurgency. His most recent book is The Complexity of Modern Irregular War, Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, forthcoming. His most recent article is “Security, Stability, and Sovereignty Challenges of Politicized Gangs and Insurgents in the Americas,” Small Wars & Insurgencies, December 2011, pp. 860-889. His most recent SSI monograph is The Strategic Logic of the Contemporary Security Dilemma, Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College, December 2011. Dr. Manwaring is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College, and holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Illinois.

*The above information may not be current. It was current at the time when the individual worked for SSI or was published by SSI.

SSI books and monographs by Dr. Max G. Manwaring

  • Venezuela as an Exporter of 4th Generation Warfare Instability

    December 19, 2012

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    We must adapt our approach to the overwhelming reality that just as the world has evolved from an industrial society to an information-based society, so has warfare. The reality of this evolution demonstrates the need for a new paradigm of conflict based on the fact that information—not firepower—is the currency upon which war is now conducted. The new primary center of gravity is public opinion and political leadership. The “new” instruments of power are intelligence, public diplomacy, media, time, and flexibility. The one thing that remains the same is that one level or another of compulsion still defines war.

  • Ambassador Stephen Krasner's Orienting Principle for Foreign Policy (and Military Management)—Responsible Sovereignty

    April 27, 2012

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    This monograph takes the logic of the contemporary security dilemma to another level. The intent is to operationalize and elaborate Ambassador Stephen Krasner’s "Responsible Sovereignty" orienting principle for foreign policy and military management.

  • The Strategic Logic of the Contemporary Security Dilemma

    December 01, 2011

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    This monograph is part of a continuing effort to inform the contemporary transnational security debate, move it to the strategic level, and support the best interests of the United States Government and peoples, and also those of the Western Hemisphere and the rest of the world.

  • A "New" Dynamic in the Western Hemisphere Security Environment: The Mexican Zetas and Other Private Armies

    September 25, 2009

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    A new and dangerous dynamic has been introduced into the Mexican internal security environment. That new dynamic is represented by a private military organization called the Zetas, and involves the migration of power from traditional state and nonstate adversaries to nontraditional nonstate private military organizations. Moreover, the actions of this irregular nonstate actor tend to be more political-psychological than military, and further move the threat from hard power to soft power solutions.

  • State and Nonstate Associated Gangs: Credible "Midwives of New Social Orders"

    May 22, 2009

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author addresses the subject of the multifaceted nature and predominant role of gangs operating as state and nonstate proxies in the modern unbalanced global security environment. In every phase of the process of compelling radical political change, agitator-gangs and popular militias play significant roles in helping their political patrons prepare to take control of a targeted political-social entity. As a result, gangs (bandas criminales or whatever they may be called) are important components of a highly complex political-psychological-military act—contemporary irregular asymmetrical political war.

  • A Contemporary Challenge to State Sovereignty: Gangs and Other Illicit Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) in Central America, El Salvador, Mexico, Jamaica, and Brazil

    January 15, 2008

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    Building on his 2005 monograph, Street Gangs: The New Urban Insurgency, the author answers questions regarding “What are the implications of the gang and other Transnational Criminal Organizations’ assault on stability in the Western Hemisphere?” and “What are the implications of the clash of values between liberal democracy and criminal anarchy?”

  • Latin America's New Security Reality: Irregular Asymmetric Conflict and Hugo Chavez

    August 24, 2007

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author answers questions regarding “What is President Hugo Chavez doing in Venezuela?” “What are his plans for the future and for the rest of Latin America?” and “What are the implications for stability and instability in the Hemisphere?”

  • Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, Bolivarian Socialism, and Asymmetric Warfare

    October 01, 2005

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author answers questions regarding Who is Hugo Chavez? How can the innumerable charges and countercharges between the Venezuelan and U.S. governments be interpreted? What is Chavez's bolivarianismo? And, What are the implications for stability and instability in Latin America?

  • Street Gangs: The New Urban Insurgency

    March 01, 2005

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author identifies the political-strategic challenges of contemporary unconventional conflict. He focuses on the political complexity of the gang phenomenon, and the common linkage between third generation gangs and insurgents.

  • Shadows of Things Past and Images of the Future: Lessons for the Insurgencies in Our Midst

    November 01, 2004

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author identifies the political-strategic challenges of modern unconventional conflicts, with a focus on the political complexity of insurgency. This report comes at a time when U.S. and other world political and military leaders have been struggling with the "new" political-psychological aspects of insurgency/terrorist war.

  • Security in the Americas: Neither Evolution nor Devolution--Impasse

    March 01, 2004

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author identifies the strategic-political challenge of effective sovereignty and security, with a focus on nontraditional threats. If the United States and the other countries of the Western Hemisphere ignore what is happening in Latin America, the expansion of terrorism, "lawless areas," and general instability easily could destroy the democracy, free market economies, and prosperity.

  • Building Regional Security Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere: Issues and Recommendations

    October 01, 2003

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring, COL Wendy Fontela, Dr. Mary Grizzard, Mr. Dennis M. Rempe.
    Dr. Max Manwaring and his team of conference rapporteurs have generated a substantive set of issues and recommendations. They have provided a viable means by which to begin the implementation of serious hemispheric security cooperation. This report comes at a critical juncture, a time of promise for greater economic integration between the United States and Latin America.

  • Strategic Effects of Conflict with Iraq: Latin America

    March 01, 2003

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author has been asked to analyze four issues: the position that key states in their region are taking on U.S. military action against Iraq; the role of America in the region after the war with Iraq; the nature of security partnerships in the region after the war with Iraq; and the effect that war with Iraq will have on the war on terrorism in the region.

  • Nonstate Actors in Colombia: Threat and Response

    May 01, 2002

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    Colombia's "Hobbesian Trinity" of illegal drug traffickers, insurgents, and paramilitary organizations are creating a situation in which life is indeed "nasty, brutish, and short." Political and military leaders can start thinking about the gravity of the terrorist strategy employed by Colombia's stateless adversaries from this point. It is also the point from which leaders can begin developing re

  • The Inescapable Global Security Arena

    April 01, 2002

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The author outlines the violent characteristics of the new security-stability environment and briefly examines the problem of terrorism and the related problem of governance. Finally, he enumerates some civil-military implications for playing effectively in the contemporary global security arena.

  • Internal Wars: Rethinking Problem and Response

    September 01, 2001

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    Asymmetric guerrilla war--insurgencies, internal wars, and other small-scale contingencies (SSCs)--are the most pervasive and likely type of conflict in the post-Cold War era. The author draws from the lessons of the recent past to better prepare today's civilian and military leaders to meet the unconventional and asymmetric warfare challenges that face the United States and the rest of the intern

  • U.S. Security Policy in the Western Hemisphere: Why Colombia, Why Now, and What Is To Be Done?

    June 01, 2001

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    In substantive U.S. national security terms, the author addresses the questions, Why Colombia, Why Now, and What Is To Be Done? He points out that the fragile democracy of Colombia is at risk, and that the violent spillover effects of three simultaneous wars pose a threat to the rest of the Western Hemisphere and the interdependent global community. He recommends an actionable political-military s

  • ". . . to insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense . . ."

    September 01, 2000

    Edited by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    On April 11-13, 2000, the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute sponsored a major conference that examined what the Department of Defense must do "to insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence . . ., given the increasing contemporary threats to the U.S. homeland. This book highlights the issues and themes that ran through the conference.

  • Security and Civil-Military Relations in the New World Disorder: The Use of Armed Forces in the Americas

    September 01, 1999

    Edited by Dr. Max G. Manwaring.
    The book is organized as an anthology of the best of a series of excellent symposium presentations, revised in light of the discussions that took place there, and complemented by an explanation of the strategic interests of the United States in Latin America and an overview.

  • The Challenge of Haiti's Future: Report on the Conference Sponsored by U.S. Army War College, Georgetown University, and the Inter-American Dialogue

    August 01, 1997

    Authored by Dr. Max G. Manwaring, Dr. Donald E. Schulz, Robert Maguire, Dr. Peter Hakim, Dr. Abigail Horn.
    This Special Report contains an account of a conference on "The Challenge of Haiti's Future," sponsored by the U.S. Army War College, Georgetown University, and the Inter-American Dialogue, and held on February 10-11, 1997, on Capitol Hill, Washington, DC.