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Military Change & Transformation Studies

Added August 01, 1996
Type: Book
Unification of the United States Armed Forces: Implementing the 1986 Department of Defense Reorganization Act. Authored by Professor Douglas C. Lovelace, Jr..
The increased unification the Goldwater-Nichols Act was intended to bring to the Department of Defense was considered too extreme by some, but insufficient by others. Professor Douglas Lovelace assesses many of the act's major provisions.
Added May 01, 1996
Type: Book
China and the Revolution in Military Affairs. Authored by Dr. Bates Gill, LTC Lonnie Henley.
Dr. Bates Gill argued that there is more to participating in the RMA than securing or producing high-tech weaponry. Army Lieutenant Colonel Lonnie Henley argues that, over the next 20 years, China will deploy a dozen or so divisions possessing relatively advanced systems, but that overall, the PLA will remain about a generation behind the U.S. Army.
Added May 01, 1996
Type: Book
The Troubled Path to the Pentagon's Rules on Media Access to the Battlefield: Grenada to Today. Authored by Dr. Pascale Combelles-Siegel.
Ms. Pascale Combelles-Siegel examines the difficult road traveled by the press and the military since Operation URGENT FURY in 1983. She focuses on the development of the 1992 Joint Doctrine for Public Affairs as a practical tool for reducing tension and providing press access to the battle. Her analysis reflects the duality of the relationship and the efforts of both communities to find a modus vivendi.
Added March 01, 1996
Type: Book
The Future of American Landpower: Strategic Challenges for the 21st Century Army. Authored by Dr. William T. Johnsen, Dr. Douglas V. Johnson, II, Professor Douglas C. Lovelace, Jr., Dr. Steven Metz, LTC James Kievit.
Armies historically have been criticized for preparing for the last war. Since the early 1980s, however, the U.S. Army has broken this pattern and created a force capable of winning the next war. But, in an era characterized by a volatile international security environment, accelerating technological advances (particularly in acquiring, processing, and disseminating information), the emergence of what some are calling a "revolution in military affairs," and forecasts of increasingly constrained fiscal resources, it seems ill-advised to plan only for the "next Army."