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Europe and Russia Studies

Added December 01, 2004
Type: Monograph
U.S.-Ukraine Military Relations and the Value of Interoperability. Authored by Mr. Leonid I. Polyakov.
Experience of recent years demonstrates that troops of post-Soviet Ukraine have been and continue to be a potential coalition partner of the U.S. Army; so success of American future engagement could depend on how these two countries act today to build their interoperability. This monograph provides a comprehensive account of Ukrainian-American defense relations and outlines the lessons learned and challenges ahead for both partners.
Added October 01, 2004
Type: Monograph
Civil-Military Cooperation in Peace Operations: The Case of Kosovo. Authored by Dr. Thomas R. Mockaitis.
The humanitarian intervention in Kosovo illustrates the challenges and possibilities of civil-military cooperation (CIMIC) in peace operations. Properly analyzed, this case study yields invaluable lessons that may inform the conduct of future missions. The current missions in Iraq and Afghanistan make this study timely and relevant.
Added July 01, 2004
Type: Monograph
Britain's Role in U.S. Missile Defense. Authored by Dr. Jeremy Stocker.
The future shape and effectiveness of U.S. missile defense will depend to some extent on the attitude and participation of America's key ally, Britain. This new monograph traces the history of British attitudes towards missile defense, and examines the UK's current policy on the subject.
Added February 01, 2004
Type: Monograph
Reconfiguring the American Military Presence in Europe. Authored by LTC Raymond A. Millen.
America has three basic options regarding the basing of ground troops in Europe--complete withdrawal, annual rotations, and restructuring the Alliance to accommodate a smaller U.S. presence. Restructuring NATO to nine integrated multinational divisions permits greater burden sharing and an expeditionary capability.