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Era of Persistent Conflict Studies

Added June 07, 2016
Type: Monograph
Outplayed: Regaining Strategic Initiative in the Gray Zone, A Report Sponsored by the Army Capabilities Integration Center in Coordination with Joint Staff J-39/Strategic Multi-Layer Assessment Branch. Authored by Mr. Nathan P. Freier, Lieutenant Colonel Charles R. Burnett, Colonel William J. Cain, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel Christopher D. Compton, Lieutenant Colonel Sean M. Hankard, Professor Robert S. Hume, Lieutenant Colonel Gary R. Kramlich, II, Colonel J. Matthew Lissner, Lieutenant Colonel Tobin A. Magsig, Colonel Daniel E. Mouton, Mr. Michael S. Muztafago, Colonel James M. Schultze, Professor John F. Troxell, Lieutenant Colonel Dennis G. Wille.
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This report concludes gray zone competition and conflict will persist as Department of Defense (DoD) pacers for the foreseeable future. It describes trends contributing to the emergence of gray zone challenges, major gray zone archetypes, and their defense implications and finally, specific recommendations for more activist and adaptive DoD responses to persistent gray zone provocation.
Added April 04, 2016
Type: Monograph
Operating in the Gray Zone: An Alternative Paradigm for U.S. Military Strategy. Authored by Dr. Antulio J. Echevarria, II.
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The idea of gray zone wars is not new, but why does the West think it is and why has it struggled to deal with it? How can the West adjust its way of thinking about strategy and war to operate better in the gray zone?
Added March 15, 2016
Type: Monograph
Old and New Insurgency Forms. Authored by Dr. Robert J. Bunker.
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While the study of insurgency extends well over 100 years and has its origins in the guerrilla and small wars of the 19th century and beyond, almost no cross-modal analysis—that is, dedicated insurgency form typology identification—has been conducted. This monograph creates a proposed insurgency typology divided into legacy, contemporary, and emergent and potential insurgency forms, and provides strategic implications for U.S. defense policy as they relate to each of these forms.